College of Natural Resources, UC Berkeley

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July 25, 2008

Get Research Experience at CNR

Learning at CNR takes you out of the classroom and puts you in the lab and the field - where you don't just read about science - you create it.

July 24, 2008

Dr. Robert Nesheim, beloved friend of the College of Natural Resources, has died at 86

Dr. Robert O. Nesheim, a research and development executive in the food industry, past lecturer in the department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology at UC Berkeley, and a beloved member of the College of Natural Resources community, died Saturday, July 19 at his home in Monterey, Calif. He was 86.

Dr. Robert O. Nesheim
Dr. Robert O. Nesheim

Nesheim was married to professor emerita Doris Calloway, a pioneering nutritional scientist who spent 27 years at the College of Natural Resources. Together, Nesheim and Colloway were partners in the science and practice of nutrition and foods. Nesheim assisted Dr. Calloway in mentoring UC Berkeley graduate students and serving on national and international nutrition committees. Before Calloway's death, Nesheim made a major contribution to the College, establishing the Doris Calloway Faculty Chair in Human Nutrition in her honor.

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July 22, 2008

Tracking Raindrops

Everyone relies on the water cycle, but how does it really work? This episode of KQED's science program Quest focuses on UC Berkeley scientists, including Inez Fung, professor of environmental science, policy and management, and their project to learn how global warming is affecting our fresh water supply.

July 21, 2008

Outdoor enthusiasts scaring off native carnivores in parks

BERKELEY — Even a quiet stroll in the park can dramatically change natural ecosystems, according to a new study by conservation biologists. These findings could have important implications for land management policies.

The study compared parks in the San Francisco Bay Area that allow only quiet recreation such as hiking or dog walking with nearby nature reserves that allow no public access. Evidence of some native carnivore populations - coyote and bobcat - was more than five times lower in parks that allow public access than in neighboring reserves where humans don't tread, the researchers report.

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July 18, 2008

Regents' vote formalizes appointment of J. Keith Gilless as CNR's Dean

Dean J. Keith GillessThe UC Board of Regents has approved the appointment of six new deans for the University of California, Berkeley, following highly competitive searches and the recommendation of UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The Regents' action on Thursday (July 17) at UC Santa Barbara cleared the appointment of Professor J. Keith Gilless as Dean of the College of Natural Resources.

Gilless has been serving as interim dean since Paul Ludden accepted the position of provost and vice president for academic affairs at Southern Methodist University in 2007.

Gilless joined the faculty in1983 and is professor of Forest Economics and Management jointly in the departments of Environmental Science, Policy and Management and of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

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July 10, 2008

Genes could solve pollution mysteries

Researchers have for the first time identified environmental pollutants by looking at the genes of a small, freshwater crustacean. This new gene-based technique could lead to better and faster lab tests for pinpointing pollutants in contaminated ecosystems.

In a study published online on July 10 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, scientists measured changes in gene expression in the genome of Daphnia magna, the tiny transparent water flea commonly used for lab studies, to track down poisons in two polluted rivers in California. This is the first time gene expression has been used to identify an environmental pollutant - in this case, copper from nearby mines.

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July 4, 2008

California Ablaze

Hot, dry atmosphere has made this spring one of the worst fire seasons in California history. Due to limited number of firefighters and equipment, hundreds of remote blazes are remained to burn. Is this a sign of fire seasons to come, and are we prepared to handle it?

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July 3, 2008

Nature reserves attract humans, but at a cost to biodiversity, says study

BERKELEY – Rather than suppressing local communities in developing nations, nature reserves attract human settlement, according to a new study by researchers.

In an analysis of 306 rural protected areas in 45 countries in Africa and Latin America, the researchers found that, on average, the rate of human population growth along the borders of protected areas was nearly twice that of neighboring rural areas.

Continue reading "Nature reserves attract humans, but at a cost to biodiversity, says study " »

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Get Research Experience at CNR
Dr. Robert Nesheim, beloved friend of the College of Natural Resources, has died at 86
Tracking Raindrops
Outdoor enthusiasts scaring off native carnivores in parks
Regents' vote formalizes appointment of J. Keith Gilless as CNR's Dean
Genes could solve pollution mysteries
California Ablaze
Nature reserves attract humans, but at a cost to biodiversity, says study

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