College of Natural Resources, UC Berkeley

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November 18, 2008

The staggering cost of climate change quantified for California

Hot on the heels of a report demonstrating the economic opportunities available to California if it invests in policies to address climate change, ARE adjunct professor David Roland-Holst has released a new study showing the enormous costs to the state posed by global warming.

About $2.5 trillion of real estate assets in California are at risk, with a projected annual price tag of between $300 million and $3.9 billion, according to the report.

Audio: David Roland-Holst discusses the report on KQED Forum.

Reports the LA Times:

For the first time, the costs of global warming's projected effects in the nation's largest state have been quantified: About $2.5 trillion of real estate assets in California are at risk from extreme weather events, sea level rise and wildfires, with a projected annual price tag of between $300 million and $3.9 billion.

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November 7, 2008

Collaborative Research on the Navajo Reservation

by Carl Wilmsen
Director, Community Forestry and Environmental Research Partnerships

Blowing sand moves across the landscape, coloring the sky with an eerie reddish hue. Sand dunes move, as if alive, slowly but surely burying homes, corrals, feeding stations and pasture lands that lie in their path. One family, known for its generosity in providing ceremonial shelters for community use, had to move the shelters from the path of a dune behind their house. Community residents have learned to carry shovels in their vehicles in case they get stuck in the soft sand covering the unpaved roads they travel on their daily rounds of visiting relatives, shopping for groceries and going to the gas station. Young people worry about their elders, especially when they travel alone, who may need assistance when the shovel fails to do the job.

About CFERP Fellowships
Welcome to daily life around Tuba City, Arizona, on the Navajo reservation. Here the problem of sand dune movement has reached the point where area residents are seeking innovative ways of controlling it. Leanna Begay, a masters-level graduate student in biology at Purdue University, is responding to the concerns of the elders and others in her community by studying the role native and non-native plants play in sand dune movement. Her goal is to combine scientific and traditional ecological knowledge to develop an understanding of how revegetation might be used to stabilize the dunes.

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