College of Natural Resources, UC Berkeley

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April 28, 2014

Inez Fung elected to AAAS

fung-climate175.jpgInez Fung, a professor of environmental science, policy, and management, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS), it was announced last week.

The new members for 2014, the academy said in a release, are 204 of “the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists and civic, corporate and philanthropic leaders.”

Fung is an atmospheric scientist and a member of the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. She recently co-led another international team that produced a public-facing report on the status of climate change.

Read the complete announcement from the UC Berkeley News Center on the list of seven Berkeley AAAS fellows, which includes Chancellor Nicholas Dirks.

April 17, 2014

More and bigger wildfires burning in Western U.S.

By Alexandra Branscombe, American Geophysical Union

Wildfires across the western United States have been getting bigger and more frequent over the last 30 years – a trend that could continue as climate change causes temperatures to rise and drought to become more severe in the coming decades, according to new research.

The number of wildfires over 1,000 acres in size in the region stretching from Nebraska to California increased by a rate of seven fires a year from 1984 to 2011, according to a new study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal published by the American Geophysical Union.

Continue reading "More and bigger wildfires burning in Western U.S." »

April 15, 2014

New biomarker discovery can help scientists ID sudden oak death-susceptible trees

Adapted from an article by Mauricio Espinoza, Ohio State University

UC Berkeley and Ohio State University researchers have developed a way to predict the resistance or susceptibility of trees to sudden oak death disease, providing forest managers with the first effective method to manage trees in infested natural areas and in adjoining areas where the disease is expected in the future.

Sudden oak death, a forest disease caused by the invasive fungus-like pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, was first detected in California in 1995. It has since killed millions of tanoaks and trees of several oak species on the West Coast. It is also a potential threat to the valuable Eastern oak species, some of which are known to be highly susceptible to the disease.

liveoak305.jpg

Continue reading "New biomarker discovery can help scientists ID sudden oak death-susceptible trees" »

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Inez Fung elected to AAAS
More and bigger wildfires burning in Western U.S.
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