Blog of the Peer Advising Leadership Program, College of Natural Resources, UC Berkeley

March 10, 2011 1:02 AM

My 5 All Time Favorite Classes at Cal

As a senior majoring in Nutritional Science, I've taken a great deal of classes at Cal. I've enjoyed many of these classes over the years, and I have narrowed down my top 5 all time favorite classes that I believe all UC Berkeley students should take.


1. Nutritional Science 10: Introduction to Nutritional Sciences
This was the class that convinced me to major in Nutritional Sciences! Taking this class changed the way I viewed food and helped me be more conscious about the foods I ate. I definitely eat a more balanced diet now than I did before. I love biology and this class reviews basic topics covered in AP Biology. It also makes you realize how important nutrition is to your health since many ailments can arise with an inadequate diet.


2. Environmental Science 10: Introduction to Environmental Sciences
This class introduces you to the environmental problems that we face today, such as our limited supply of freshwater, the impacts of global warming, and the increase in solid wastes. It taught me how important it was to lead a more sustainable lifestyle since our resources, such as freshwater and fossil fuels, are running out. I believe that every student in Berkeley should take this class because it makes you more aware of how fragile our ecosystem is and what steps we should take in order to preserve it. Simply making a few small changes in your daily habits, such as not leaving the water running when you brush your teeth or turning off appliances or lights that are not in use, can make such a huge difference.

3. Anthropology 3AC: Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology
This was the first humanities course I took in Berkeley. It was such a breath of fresh air in the midst of my pre-med requirements. I learned how important culture is in shaping a person's identity and how the American culture shapes the way we think. An interesting fact I still remember is that gender roles are social constructs and are placed on us by our parents and relatives right when we are born. Girls are taught to behave like females with the toys we are given, such as easy bake ovens and barbie dolls and boys are taught to behave like men with their toy cars and Legos.


4. Nutritional Science 104: Human Food Practices
I am currently taking this class and I am so excited to go to lecture every Friday. This is a two unit class and the majority of students get A's and B's. I have already learned so much about our food system in America and the different policies enacted to try to combat the current obesity epidemic. Just last week, we talked about the possibility of placing a tax on soda in hopes to decrease the demand and purchase of this unhealthy drink.


5. Nutritional Science 103: Nutrient Function and Metabolism
This was the first upper division Nutritional Science course that I took and confirmed my love of the major. Professor Sharon Flemming is one of the best professors that I've ever had at UC Berkeley. She explains difficult concepts with ease in a way that even non science majors would understand. This is a great class to be taken concurrently with MCB 102 since many topics about metabolism overlap.


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