Category Archives: News and Publications

Groundbreaking Study Shows How Sustainable Farming Practices Can Improve Yields

By Marcia De Longe, Union of Concerend Scientists, December 9, 2014.

News article featuring Lauren Ponisio’s recent research!  

Link to the full news article here

Check out Lauren’s Paper Below:

Download (PDF, 334KB)

Full Article Link: http://blog.ucsusa.org/groundbreaking-study-shows-how-sustainable-farming-practices-can-improve-yields-755?_ga=1.20608568.1671361181.1416371805

Recent Publications October 2014

  1. From research to action: enhancing crop yield through wild pollinators. Frontiers in Ecology

    Garibaldi, L. A., Carvalheiro, L. G., Leonhardt, S. D., Aizen, M. A., Blaauw, B. R., Isaacs, R., Kuhlmann, M., Kleijn, D., Klein, A. M., Kremen, C., Morandin, L., Scheper, J. and Winfree, R.

    2014. Frontiers in Ecology, 12(8): 439-447

  2. Neotropical agriculture reduces phylogenetic diversity and favors closely related birds

    Frishkoff, L. O., Karp, D. S., M’Gonigle, L. K., Mendenhall, C. D., Zook, J., Kremen, C., Hadly, E. A., and Daily, G. C.

    2014. Science, 345(6202): 1343-1346

  3. Species abundance, not diet breadth, drives the persistence of the most linked pollinators as plant-pollinator networks disassemble

    Winfree, R., N.M. Williams, J. Dushoff and C. Kremen.

    2014. American Naturalist, 183: 600-611.

  4. Competitive impacts of an invasive nectar thief on plant-pollinator mutualisms

    Hanna, C., D. Foote and C. Kremen

    2014, Ecology, 95(6): 1622-1632

  5. Hedgerows enhance beneficial insects on adjacent tomato fields in an intensive agricultural landscape

    Morandin, L. A., Long, R.L, and C. Kremen

    2014, In Press. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment.

Claire receives the 2014 Honorable John C. Pritzlaff Conservation Award!

Pritzlaff Award Symposium2014 Final

 The Buzz about Pollinators from Farms to Wildlands

Garden hosts Pritzlaff santa barbaraConservation Award and Symposium

 Santa Barbara, CA, September 2014

The Santa Barbara Botanic Garden is pleased to announce the winner of the 2014 Honorable John C. Pritzlaff Conservation Award, Dr. Claire Kremen, from the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at U.C. Berkeley. Dr. Kremen is recognized world-wide for her conservation research involving pollinators in the agricultural landscape.  Her award will be presented Thursday, October 2nd at the Pritzlaff Dinner and Award Ceremony.  Dr. Kremen will be joined by leading professionals in the fields of ecology, entomology, and education for the Hon. John C. Pritzlaff Conservation Symposium to be held Friday, October 3, from 10-4pm. The public is invited to attend both events.

“As a leader in research and conservation of native plants, the Garden presents the Prizlaff Award to recognize global trailblazers in the field,” said Dr. Steve Windhager, Executive Director at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. “The symposium connects the public to leading researchers who might otherwise only be accessible in an academic or professional setting.”   The Santa Barbara Botanic Garden is an active research facility that has been working to understand and preserve California’s unique biodiversity for nearly a century, and serves as a resource for scientists all over the world.

This year’s symposium, Native Plants Supporting Pollinators: Solutions from Farms to Wildlands, will include discussions of how plants and pollinators depend on each other, the decline of pollinators such as bees, and how everyday citizens are making a difference.

“The public is very interested in honeybees and the effect their decline has on food production,” says Dr. Denise Knapp, Director of Conservation and Research at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, “The symposium speakers expand on that concern to address the role of native insects as pollinators, which benefit from the native plants that they have evolved with.  We are discovering that native habitat buffers are integrally connected to a sustainable food supply.”

The keynote speaker and award winner, Dr. Kremen, is a conservation biologist who seeks “mechanisms for slowing or preventing the loss of biodiversity…one of the greatest environmental challenges facing humanity in the 21st century.” She has tackled this issue both by protecting biodiverse areas globally in preserves, and by identifying and conserving the species most beneficial to humans, particularly in California’s agricultural areas.  Dr. Kremen received a B.S. from Stanford, a Ph.D from Duke, and was an assistant professor at Princeton before coming to Berkeley. She has produced over 123 articles, and her work has been cited at least 10,694 times.

This year’s expert speakers and their topic areas are:

  • Claire Kremen, Restoring pollinator communities in California’s agricultural landscapes
  • Robbin Thorp, The plight of our bumblebees
  • Denise Knapp, Pollinators need natives: how alien invasions have changed the game
  • Gretchen LeBuhn, Using Citizen Science to understand patterns of pollination service across the United States
  • Frédérique Lavoipierre, Monarch butterflies, milkweed, and… eucalyptus? Effects of habitat resources on an iconic butterfly
  • Cause Hanna, Using plant-pollinator networks to manage invasive species and restore degraded ecosystems

The Symposium will conclude with a panel discussion and audience participation addressing strategies for supporting the role of native pollinators and their habitat.

The Honorable John C. Pritzlaff Conservation Award, established in 2007, honors this former Garden Trustee’s lifelong commitment to conservation. The award serves to inspire others to understand the importance of conservation, take action, and help the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden reach its plant conservation leadership goals.

For further information, to arrange interviews with panelists, or to request high-resolution images or broadcast quality B-roll please contact Rebecca Mordini,  Communications Manager, at 805-682-4726 ext. 132. Admission for working media during the events are available upon request.  The Symposium is funded in part by Union Bank.

# # # #

About the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden: The Garden is a 78-acre educational and scientific institution fostering the conservation of California’s native plants and serves as a role model for sustainable practice in Santa Barbara, California.  The Garden was founded in 1926 and is among of the nation’s oldest botanic gardens focused exclusively on native plants.

Recent Publications September 2014

  1. From research to action: enhancing crop yield through wild pollinators. Frontiers in Ecology

    Garibaldi, L. A., Carvalheiro, L. G., Leonhardt, S. D., Aizen, M. A., Blaauw, B. R., Isaacs, R., Kuhlmann, M., Kleijn, D., Klein, A. M., Kremen, C., Morandin, L., Scheper, J. and Winfree, R.

    2014. Frontiers in Ecology, 12(8): 439-447

  2. Neotropical agriculture reduces phylogenetic diversity and favors closely related birds

    Frishkoff, L. O., Karp, D. S., M’Gonigle, L. K., Mendenhall, C. D., Zook, J., Kremen, C., Hadly, E. A., and Daily, G. C.

    2014. Science, 345(6202): 1343-1346

  3. Species abundance, not diet breadth, drives the persistence of the most linked pollinators as plant-pollinator networks disassemble

    Winfree, R., N.M. Williams, J. Dushoff and C. Kremen.

    2014. American Naturalist, 183: 600-611.

  4. Competitive impacts of an invasive nectar thief on plant-pollinator mutualisms

    Hanna, C., D. Foote and C. Kremen

    2014, Ecology, 95(6): 1622-1632

  5. Hedgerows enhance beneficial insects on adjacent tomato fields in an intensive agricultural landscape

    Morandin, L. A., Long, R.L, and C. Kremen

    2014, In Press. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment.

Recent Publications

Below are some recent publications from Kremen Lab:

  1. From research to action: enhancing crop yield through wild pollinators. Frontiers in Ecology

    Garibaldi, L. A., Carvalheiro, L. G., Leonhardt, S. D., Aizen, M. A., Blaauw, B. R., Isaacs, R., Kuhlmann, M., Kleijn, D., Klein, A. M., Kremen, C., Morandin, L., Scheper, J. and Winfree, R.

    2014. Frontiers in Ecology, 12(8): 439-447

  2. Neotropical agriculture reduces phylogenetic diversity and favors closely related birds

    Frishkoff, L. O., Karp, D. S., M’Gonigle, L. K., Mendenhall, C. D., Zook, J., Kremen, C., Hadly, E. A., and Daily, G. C.

    2014. Science, 345(6202): 1343-1346

  3. Species abundance, not diet breadth, drives the persistence of the most linked pollinators as plant-pollinator networks disassemble

    Winfree, R., N.M. Williams, J. Dushoff and C. Kremen.

    2014. American Naturalist, 183: 600-611.

  4. Competitive impacts of an invasive nectar thief on plant-pollinator mutualisms

    Hanna, C., D. Foote and C. Kremen

    2014, Ecology, 95(6): 1622-1632

  5. Hedgerows enhance beneficial insects on adjacent tomato fields in an intensive agricultural landscape

    Morandin, L. A., Long, R.L, and C. Kremen

    2014, In Press. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment.

Why Farmers Must Grow Insects Like a Crop – Or Starve

For the last few years, Richard Rant has agreed to let researchers introduce strips of wildflowers among the blueberry plants on his family’s farm in West Olive, Michigan. It’s part of an experiment to see if the wildflowers can encourage pollinating insects and, in a small way, begin to reverse the worldwide decline in beneficial insects. It’s also a pioneering effort in the nascent movement to persuade farmers to grow insects almost as if they were a crop.

February 3rd, 2014. Richard Conniff