Rachel Morello-Frosch

Rachel Morello-Frosch

Professor, ESPM and School of Public Health
Research Description
I am a Professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management and the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley.  As an environmental health scientist and epidemiologist, my research examines social determinants of environmental health among diverse communities in the US with a focus on social inequality, psychosocial stress and how these factors interact with environmental chemical exposures to produce health inequalities. My work has examined this environmental justice question in the context of ambient air pollution, drinking water quality, climate change as well as prenatal exposures to environmental chemicals and effects on developmental outcomes.  I also collaborate with other scientists and community partners to leverage public data as well as apply community-based participatory research methods to carry out much of my research, including developing study protocols, conducting data collection and leveraging research results to improve policy.  In collaboration with researchers, regulatory scientists, and community partners, I have developed scientifically valid and transparent tools for assessing the cumulative impacts of chemical and non-chemical stressors to improve regulatory decision-making and advance environmental justice in California.  

Download RMorello-Frosch CV – 2021

 

Lauren Baehner

Lauren Baehner

Research Associate
Education

MPH, Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health; University of California, Berkeley

BS, Cell Biology; University of Kansas
BA, Anthropology; University of Kansas

Research Interests

Environmental justice, community-based participatory research, climate change, health equity

Research Description

My work is focused on the Women Workers Biomonitoring Collaborative, and I support other projects in the lab. Prior to joining the S/HE lab, I was a research scientist with the Biomonitoring California program at the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) where I contributed to both community-focused and statewide surveillance biomonitoring studies. There, my work included improving the participant experience and reporting results back to participants at the individual and study level, data analysis on exposure to metals, and I also supported work and analysis on PFASs and environmental phenols. Also at CDPH, I coordinated a mercury exposure reduction program that provided grants to community-based organizations for education on exposure to mercury from fish consumption in the Sacramento San Joaquin River Delta. Additionally, I have experience in community health. I worked as a program evaluator for a community health clinic supporting several grant funded mental health programs and forming an Evaluation Advisory Board with Native and Indigenous families using participatory methods. I also worked with a pay-for-performance program that supported Medi-cal community-based clinics and medical groups in San Francisco to improve system and health outcomes.

Lara Cushing

Lara Cushing

Assistant Professor, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

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Education

PhD, Energy & Resources; University of California, Berkeley (2016)

MPH, Epidemiology; University of California, Berkeley (2011)

BS, Molecular Environmental Biology; University of California, Berkeley (2003)

Research Interests
environmental justice, climate change, GIS, community-engaged scholarship
Research Description

My research examines social inequalities in environmental exposures and the combined impacts of environmental and social stressors on health. My work has investigated questions of environmental justice in the context of pollution sources and hazardous sites, prenatal exposures to harmful chemicals, and climate change. Current projects include examining the impact of flaring from oil and gas wells on reproductive health outcomes and work to reduce the health risks of unsafe drinking water among low income households reliant on private wells.

Selected Publications

1. Andrade, J., L. Cushing, A. Wesner, “Science Shops and the US Research University: A Path for Community-Engaged Scholarship and Disruption of the Power Dynamics of Knowledge Production” In: Education for Citizenship and Social Justice, T.D. Mitchell and K.M. Soria (eds.), Palgrave Macmillan, Chan, 2018, ISBN 978-3-319-62970-4, pgs. 149-165

2. Casey, J.A., P. James, L. Cushing, B.M. Jesdale, R. Morello-Frosch, “Race, Ethnicity, Income Concentration and 10-Year Change in Urban Greenness in the United States” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2017) 14 (12) 1546-1561, doi:10.3390/ijerph14121546

3. Morello-Frosch, R., L. Cushing, B.M. Jesdale, J. Schwartz, W. Guo, T. Guo, M. Wang, S. Harwani, S.S. Petropoulou, W. Duong, J.S. Park, M. Petreas, R. Gajek, J. Alvaran, J. She, R. Das and T.J. Woodruff, “Environmental Chemicals in an Urban Population of Pregnant Women and their Newborns from San Francisco” Environmental Science & Technology (2016) 50 (22): 12464–12472, doi: 10.1021/acs.est.6b03492

4. Cushing, L., J. Faust, L. August, R. Cendak, W. Wieland and G. Alexeeff, “Racial/ethnic disparities in cumulative environmental health impacts in California: evidence from a state-wide environmental justice screening tool (CalEnviroScreen 1.1)” American Journal of Public Health (2015) 105(11): 2341-2348, doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302643

5. Cushing, L., R. Morello-Frosch, M. Wander and M. Pastor, “The Haves, the Have-nots, and the Health of Everyone: The Relationship between Social Inequality and Environmental Quality”, Annual Review of Public Health (2015), 18(36): 193-209, doi: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031914-122646

6. Jesdale, B., R. Morello-Frosch and L. Cushing, “The Racial/Ethnic Distribution of Heat Risk–Related Land Cover in Relation to Residential Segregation”, Environmental Health Perspectives (2013), 121(7):811-817, doi:10.1289/ehp.1205919

Honors and Awards

Switzer Environmental Leadership Fellowship; Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation

Chancellor’s Public Fellow; University of California, Berkeley

Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Fellowship; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Recent Teaching

HED 655 Environmental Health; San Francisco State University

 

Nicholas Depsky

Nicholas Depsky

PhD Candidate in the Energy and Resources Group

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Education

BS Hydrology & Minor in Environmental Policy – UC Davis 2013
MS Energy & Resources Group – UC Berkeley 2019

Research Interests

Climate change, human migration & displacement, climate modeling, governing migration, environmental justice, federal climate policy, geospatial modeling techniques

Research Description

Nick’s research focuses on understanding the ways in which climate hazards drive human migration and displacement, and how these dynamics may evolve in coming decades. Specific focus areas include Central American droughts, Caribbean tropical cyclones and global sea level rise. He utilizes quantitative modeling and geospatial mapping techniques and is also interested in identifying governance and policy priorities surrounding these issues. Issues of environmental/climate justice also play a key role in his research motivation and framing, and he continues to be involved in environmental justice related projects at both the state and federal levels.

Selected Publications

Depsky, N. and Pons, D., 2020. Meteorological droughts are projected to worsen in Central America’s Dry Corridor throughout the 21st century. Environmental Research Letters, 16(1), p.014001.

Cash, A., Chapple, K., Depsky, N., Elias, R. R., Krnjaic, M., Manji, S., & Montano, H. (2020). Climate Change and Displacement in the U.S. – A Review of the Literature, (April), 70.

Casey, J., Cushing, L., Depsky, N., Morello-Frosch, R., 2021. Climate justice and California’s methane superemitters: An environmental equity assessment of community proximity and exposure intensity. Environmental Science and Technology

Honors and Awards

American Meteorological Society Graduate Fellowship Award – 2017-2018
InFEWS Graduate Fellowship Award – 2020-2021

Recent Teaching
Energy and Resources 100/200 – Energy and Society (Fall 2018)
Xing Gao

Xing Gao

PhD Candidate in Epidemiology
Education

MPH in Epidemiology/Biostatistics, UC Berkeley

BA in Geography and International Studies, Macalester College

Research Interests

Neighborhood environment, structural racism, racial/ethnic health inequities

Research Description

My research projects examine structural racism. neighborhood context,  and racial/ethnic inequities in maternal and cardiovascular health across the lifecourse.

Selected Publications
Berkowitz RL, Gao X, Michaels EK, Mujahid MS. Structurally Vulnerable Neighbourhood Environments and Racial/ethnic COVID-19 Inequities. Cities & Health. 2020;0(0):1-4. 
 
Mujahid MS, Sohn EK, Izenberg J, Gao X, Tulier ME, Lee, MM, Yen I. Gentrification and Displacement in the San Francisco Bay Area: A Comparison of Measurement Approaches. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16(12).
Honors and Awards
NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award    
Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award 
Recent Teaching

Epidemiologic Methods I & II, Social Epidemiology, UC Berkeley

 

Cristina Gomez-Vidal

Cristina Gomez-Vidal

PhD Candidate in the School of Social Welfare
Education

MSW, School of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley

BA, Interdisciplinary Studies Field, UC Berkeley

Minor Public Policy

Research Interests

Political government structures and governance, health equity, structurally disadvantaged communities, disadvantaged unincorporated communities facing environmental injustice, climate change, and health inequities, GIS and mixed methods for small populations.

Research Description

My research examines how U.S. political structures and governance render low-income communities of color structurally vulnerable to adverse health, environmental, and social outcomes. Currently, I am examining how the absence of a local government structure in rural disadvantaged unincorporated communities that rely solely on distal county government and electorate for decision-making impacts the distribution and quality of social determinants of health and health outcomes. Many of these communities are on the front lines of climate change and environmental injustice. However, little is understood on how their political structure may make unincorporated communities vulnerable to adverse health events.  I am using mixed methods, including GIS, to conduct research studies in the San Joaquin Valley and broadly in California and Texas. Additionally, I am interested in identifying productive methods for understanding the challenges of small hard to count populations. My research interests are grounded in over a decade of work alongside rural communities of color in the San Joaquin Valley, addressing racial and spatial health inequities associated with the built and social environment while working at a federally qualified health care center and non-profit organizations. My work is inspired by the ingenuity, tireless work, and situated knowledge of residents throughout the Valley and in particular Madera Country.

Selected Publications

Gomez-Vidal, Cristina, and Anu Manchikanti Gomez. “Invisible and unequal: Unincorporated community status as a structural determinant of health.” Social Science & Medicine 285 (2021): 114292.

Honors and Awards

RWJF Health Policy Research Scholar

 

2021-2022      County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, Research Grants

University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute

Measuring County Incorporation Status for Examination of Racial and Spatial Health Inequities

Role: Co-Investigator

 

2020-2021      Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Research Dissertation Grant

The Legal Reproduction of Infant Health Inequities in Unincorporated Communities

Role: Principal Investigator

 

2015-2016      Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity Grant, University of California, Berkeley

Underrepresented Student Research Ambassador Program

Role: Co-Project Lead

 

David J.X. Gonzalez

David J.X. Gonzalez

Postdoctoral Fellow, ESPM and School of Public Health

View website here: https://djxgonzalez.github.io/

Education

PhD, Environment and Resources, Stanford University
MS, Epidemiology, Stanford University
MESc, Environmental Science, Yale University
BS, Evolution and Ecology, University of California, Davis

Research Interests

Environmental epidemiology, perinatal epidemiology, health disparities, applied econometrics, ambient air quality, global health, environmental science, environmental justice

Research Description

David studies environmental health sciences with a focus on perinatal health, health disparities, and exposures to air pollution. He also studies mercury pollution and community health in the Peruvian Amazon. In his research he applies interdisciplinary methods from epidemiology, econometrics, and environmental science, and he conducts field work and population-level studies in California and Peru.

Selected Publications

Santana, Francisca N., David J.X. Gonzalez, and Gabrielle Wong-Parodi (2021). Psychological factors and social processes influencing wildfire smoke protective behavior: Insights from a case study in Northern California. Climate Risk Management. (PaperPress Release)

Gonzalez, David J.X., Allison R. Sherris, Wei Yang, David K. Stevenson, Amy M. Padula, Michael Baiocchi, Marshall Burke, Mark R. Cullen, and Gary M. Shaw (2020). Oil and gas production and spontaneous preterm birth in the San Joaquin Valley, CA: A case-control study. Environmental Epidemiology. (PaperPress Release)

Gonzalez, David J.X., Aubrey Arain, and Luis E. Fernandez (2019). Mercury exposure, risk factors, and perceptions among women of childbearing age in an artisanal gold mining region of the Peruvian Amazon. Environmental Research. (Paper)

Honors and Awards

Stanford Graduate Fellowship in Science & Engineering
Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship
Academic Achievement Award, Vice Provost for Graduate Education and El Centro Chicano y Latino, Stanford University
Centennial Teaching Assistant Award, Center for Teaching and Learning and School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Stanford University
Community Impact Award, Stanford Alumni Association
Graduate Scholar-in-Residence, El Centro Chicano y Latino, Stanford University
Fox International Fellowship, Yale University and El Colegio de México
Pinkerton Prize for Environmental Education, UC Davis

Recent Teaching
Shades of Green: Redesigning the Environmental Justice Movements, Stanford University
Julie Gorecki

Julie Gorecki

PhD Candidate, Environmental Science, Policy, Management
Education

PhD Candidate, Society and Environment division of Environmental Science and Policy Management; University of California, Berkeley

Masters, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS)

BA, Joint Specialist in Political Science and Philosophy, Minor in History; University of Toronto

Research Interests

Climate Change, Environmental Impact, Feminist Theory, Women and Gender Studies, Ecofeminism, Postcolonial Feminism, Post Colonial Studies, Queer Ecologies, Indigenous Feminism, Critical Theory, Feminist Economics, Environmental Studies, Environmental Philosophy, Qualitative Methodologies

Research Description

Scholars and international organizations have shown that climate change disproportionately affects women. Indigenous women and women of the Global South are particularly impacted. Women’s traditional labor roles and their lack of economic and socio-political power are proving to be non-conducive to climate change adaptation. Affected women have organized the “Women for Climate Justice” contingent — an international interface of women’s groups, collectives, initiatives and organizations — positioned at the forefront of the global climate justice movement. They look to remedy the disproportionate effects of climate change on them, while contending that women’s local work skills and knowledge can help mitigate climate change. My research investigates the nexus between climate change and gender. Specifically, I explore the burdens and solutions of the Women for Climate Justice contingent to better understand the global pattern of gendered vulnerability to climate change, as well as how it sheds light on feminist theories that explain the wider systemic oppression of women.

The theoretical component of my research is embedded in ecological feminist theories that have long contended that environmental and gender exploitation are linked. They have affirmed that capitalism’s founding ideology of continuous growth—materialized as the infinite extraction of finite natural resources—has been necessitated by the coincident subordination of women, minorities, and nature, and is based on the exploitation of women’s, power, bodies and labor.

Selected Publications

1. “‘Mother Earth’ Ethic and the Rise of Capitalism in North America,” Genesis : Rivista della Societa Italiana delle Stroriche, international and mutilingual academic journal

Honors and Awards

Arnold Schultz Fellowship (2017)

Highest Honors, Masters Degree, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) (2013)

Recent Teaching

Teacher’s Assistant, GWS 126, Film, Feminism and the Avant-Garde; UC Berkeley

Teacher’s Assistant, GWS 100AC, Women in American Cultures: Settler Colonialism, Wilderness, Women/Gender, and the American West; UC Berkeley

Graduate Student Instructor, ESPM 161, Environment Philosophy and Ethics; UC Berkeley

Graduate Student Instructor, ESPM 167 Environmental Health and Development; UC Berkeley

Graduate Student Researcher, The Fate of Nature in the Anthropocene : The Humanities and the Environmental Turn; Townsend Center Seminar

Instructor, “Introduction to Feminist Theory and Gender Studies”; Paris Diderot University (Paris 7)

 

Yang Ju

Yang Ju

Postdoc researcher, Institute of Urban and Regional Development, UC Berkeley

View website here: https://yangjugeospatial.wordpress.com/

Education

Ph.D. in Environmental Planning, University of California Berkeley

Research Interests

Built environment, environmental justice, environmental health, urban informatics

Research Description

Given rapid global trends in urbanization, as well as current and future environmental and societal challenges under climate change, solutions to a sustainable and socially just society lie in our cities. My goal is to provide scientific evidence to support more informed decision-making that aids disadvantaged populations and supports sustainable development in our communities, using GIS, remote sensing, and other analytical methods. My research questions center in the interdisciplinary fields of urbanization, environmental hazards and climate change, environmental health, environmental justice, and policy evaluation. I use various data-driven approaches, such as GIS, remote sensing, econometrics, machine learning, process-based models, and spatial statistics, to answer my research questions.

Selected Publications
  1. Ju, Y., Moran, M., Wang, X., Avila-Palencia, I., Cortinez-O’Ryan, A., Moore, K., Slovic, A. D., Sarmiento, O. L., Gouveia, N., Caiaffa, W. T., Aguilar, G., Sales, D. M., Pina, M. de F. R. P. de, Coelho, D. M., & Dronova, I. (2021). Latin American cities with higher socioeconomic status are greening from a lower baseline: Evidence from the SALURBAL project. Environmental Research Letters. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ac2a63
  2. Cunha, M. da C. M., Ju, Y., Morais, M. H. F., Dronova, I., Ribeiro, S. P., Bruhn, F. R. P., Lima, L. L., Sales, D. M., Schultes, O. L., Rodriguez, D. A., & Caiaffa, W. T. (2021). Disentangling associations between vegetation greenness and dengue in a Latin American city: Findings and challenges. Landscape and Urban Planning, 216, 104255. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2021.104255
  3. Ju, Y., Cushing, L. J., & Morello-Frosch, R. (2020). An equity analysis of clean vehicle rebate programs in California. Climatic Change, 162(4), 2087–2105. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-020-02836-w
  4. Ju, Y., Lindbergh, S., He, Y., & Radke, J. D. (2019). Climate-related uncertainties in urban exposure to sea level rise and storm surge flooding: A multi-temporal and multi-scenario analysis. Cities, 92, 230–246. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2019.04.002

Honors and Awards

  1. Yuxiu Young Scholars Program (postdoc research fellowship), 2022-2025, Nanjing University, China

Recent Teaching
  1. University of California, Berkeley
    • Lead TA, Geographic Information Systems Fall 2016
    • TA, Geographic Information Systems Fall 2014, 2015
    • TA, GIS and Environmental Spatial Data Analysis/Spatial Statistics Spring 2016
    • TA, Quantitative Methods in Environmental Planning Spring 2015
Seigi Karasaki

Seigi Karasaki

PhD Student in Energy and Resources Group
Education

MS, Energy & Resources Group, UC Berkeley
MA, International Studies (創成科学研究科国際協力学専攻), University of Tokyo
BA, East Asian Studies, UCLA

Research Interests

Drinking water access, environmental justice, GIS, community-engaged scholarship

Research Description

My research focus is on the intersection of drinking water access, social justice, institutional capacity, and individual agency. I’m primarily interested in weaving together historical and current race- and class-driven disparities in water access, using a combination of community-based research methodologies and “big data” analyses.

Honors and Awards

Fulbright Research Fellowship (2018-2019)
Human Rights Center Fellowship (2018)
InFEWS NSF Fellowship (2017-2018)
Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (2017-2018)
Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award (2017)
Global Health Entrepreneurship Fellow (2016)

Recent Teaching
Geography 20 (Globalization, Spring 2016) & 130 (Food and Environment, Spring 2017)
Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 50AC (Intro to Culture and Nature Resource Management, Fall 2016)
Energy and Resources Group 190C (Data, Science, and Society, Fall 2018) & 174 (Water and Sanitation Justice, Summer 2020)
Clare Pace

Clare Pace

Postdoctoral Scientist
Education

PhD, Environmental Science; University of Nevada, Reno

MPH, Epidemiology; University of Nevada, Reno

BS, Biology; Sierra Nevada College

BA, Fine Art; Santa Clara University

Research Interests

Environmental toxicology, environmental justice, water quality, cardiovascular toxicology, mitochondrial dysfunction

Research Description

My research focuses on environmental justice and the health effects of environmental contaminants. I am particularly interested in addressing exposure to contaminated groundwater among vulnerable populations. I also conduct research on cardiovascular, metabolic, and mitochondrial dysfunction associated with arsenic exposure. I am currently working on a project that aims to reduce the risk of exposure to contaminated drinking water in California through community involvement, education, and environmental policy.

Selected Publications

1. Pace C., Banerjee T.D., Welch B., Khalili R., Dagda R.K., Angermann J. (2016). Monomethylarsonous Acid, But not Inorganic Arsenic, is a Mitochondria Specific Toxicant in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells. Toxicology in Vitro. 35:188-201. doi: 10.1016/j.tiv.2016.06.006

2. Pace C., Dagda R.K., Angermann J. (2017). Antioxidants Protect Against Arsenic Induced Mitochondrial Cardio-toxicity. Toxics. 5, 38: doi:10.3390/toxics5040038

3. Pace C., Smith-Gagen J., Angermann J. (2018). Arsenic Methylation Capacity and Metabolic Syndrome in the 2013-2014 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health. 15, 1: 168; doi:10.3390/ijerph15010168

Honors and Awards

Suma Cum Laude, University of Nevada, Reno (2017)

Suma Cum Laude, University of Nevada, Reno (2014)

M.P.H. Academic Achievement Award, University of Nevada, Reno (2014)

Graduate Student Association, University of Nevada Reno, Student Scholarship (2014)

Nevada Public Health Association Scholarship Winner (2013)

Miles Public Health Scholarship Award, University of Nevada Reno (2011)

Valedictorian Candidate, Sierra Nevada College (2011)

Suma Cum Laude, Sierra Nevada College (2011)

Undergraduate Research Prize Recipient, 2nd place, Sierra Nevada College (2011)

Recent Teaching

Letter of Appointment. Biostatistics; University of Nevada, Reno (Spring 2018)

Adjunct Faculty. Biology; Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, NV (Fall 2016)

 

Jenny Rempel

Jenny Rempel

PhD Student in the Energy and Resources Group
Education
MA, Energy & Resources, UC Berkeley
BS, Earth Systems, Stanford University
Research Interests

Environmental justice, water access, water governance, geospatial analysis, political ecology, community-engaged scholarship

Research Description

I use mixed methods approaches to improve our understanding of the patterns and drivers of inequitable water access in efforts to provide organizers, advocates, and policymakers with the information needed to strengthen community-based solutions to longstanding water injustices. In recent research, I have used geospatial modeling and archival analysis to examine how land ownership patterns affect groundwater access and well drilling behavior, and I have characterized violations of the human right to water in rural and incarcerated communities. With the Water Equity Science Shop, I am creating tools to make drinking water data more accessible to policymakers and to community members reliant on domestic groundwater wells in California.

Selected Publications

Belfer, E. and Rempel, J. (2020). “Surfacing Overlying Rights: Assessing Transitions in Overlying Rights to California’s Groundwater Basins.” Master’s Thesis. Energy & Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley.

Honors and Awards
NSF Graduate Research Fellowship
Berkeley Fellowship for Graduate Study
National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center Graduate Research Fellowship
NSF Data Science for Society and the Environment (DS421) Fellowship
Recent Teaching
Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Equity, and the Environment (Fall 2021)
Danielle Schell

Danielle Schell

Master's Student in the School of Public Health
Education

Master’s in Public Health, Health and Social Behavior; University of California, Berkeley, Expected 2023

BA, Social Anthropology; Augustana College

Research Interests

Health equity, Social bonding and Social support, adaptive coping, kinship, long-term relationships, health autonomy, trauma healing and mental health, plant-based medicine, community-based participatory research

Research Description

My research investigates how communal experiences of healing impact health and coping, specifically how shared experiences with plant-medicine affects relationships and overall health of the individual and community. In my previous research I have worked with maternal experiences within prenatal and birthing experiences among African American women and birth outcomes in the Pacific Northwest United States. I am excited to expand my knowledge of collaborative community-driven research methods and contribute to the awesome work being done already in the S/HE lab.

Seth Shonkoff

Seth Shonkoff

Visiting Scholar, Executive Director of PSE Healthy Energy

View website here.

Education

PhD, Environmental Science, Policy and Management; University of California, Berkeley

MPH, Epidemiology, School of Public Health; University of California, Berkeley

BA, Environmental Studies; Skidmore College

Research Interests
energy, climate, health, oil and gas, air pollution, water pollution
Research Description
I am the executive director of the energy science and policy institute, PSE Healthy Energy. I am also a visiting scholar in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at UC Berkeley and an affiliate in the Environment Energy Technology Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. An environmental and public health scientist by training, I have more than 15 years of experience in water, air, climate, and population health research. I have published more than 35 peer reviewed papers and technical reports, and I am an author of multiple high profile scientific assessments including the Human Health chapter of The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), two human health chapters in the California Senate Bill 4 Independent Scientific Study on hydraulic fracturing and well stimulation; and a forthcoming assessment of the public health dimensions of underground gas storage in the State of California. I have sat on multiple science-policy expert panels, and have worked and published on topics related to the intersection of energy, air pollution, water quality, climate, and human health from scientific and policy perspectives.

Selected Publications

1. Czolowski E, Santoro RL, Srebotnjak T, Shonkoff SBC. 2017. Towards Consistent Methodology to Quantify Populations in Proximity to Oil and Gas Development: A National Spatial Analysis and Review. Environmental Health Perspectives. Online version available at: https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/EHP1535.

2. DiGiulio DC, Shonkoff SBC, Jackson RB. Submitted. The Need to Protect Fresh and Brackish Groundwater Resources During Unconventional Oil and Gas Development.

3. DiGiulio D, Shonkoff SBC. 2017. Is Reuse of Produced Water Safe? First, Let’s Find out What’s in It. August 2017. EM Magazine, a copyrighted publication of the Air & Waste Management Association.

4. Stringfellow WT, Camarillo MK, Domen JK, Shonkoff SBC. 2017. Comparison of Chemical-Use Between Hydraulic Fracturing, Acidizing, and Routine Oil and Gas Development. PLoS ONE. 12(4): e0175344. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0175344

5. Shonkoff SBC, Hays J, Hill LA, Krieger E, Hughes D, Hosang N, Law A. 2016. Trump: Renewables for Self-Sufficiency. Nature. 540:341. Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v540/n7633/pdf/540341b.pdf

6. Hays J, McCawley M, Shonkoff SBC. 2016. Public Health Implications of Environmental Noise Associated with Unconventional Oil and Gas Development. Science of The Total Environment. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969716325724.

7. Krieger E, Casey J, Shonkoff SBC. 2016. A framework for siting and dispatch of emerging energy resources to realize environmental and health benefits: Case study on peaker power plant displacement. Energy Policy. 96:302-313. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421516302798.

8. Hays J, Shonkoff SBC. 2016. Toward an Understanding of the Environmental and Public
Health Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development: A Categorical Assessment of the Peer-Reviewed Scientific Literature, 2009-2015. PLoS ONE. 11(4): e0154164. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154164.

9. Hays J, Finkel M, Depledge M, Law A, Shonkoff SBC. 2015. Considerations for the
development of shale gas in the United Kingdom. Science of The Total Environment. 512-513:
36-42. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715000078.

10. Ingraffea A, Wells M, Santoro R, Shonkoff SBC. 2014. Assessment and Risk Analysis of Casing and Cement Impairment in Oil and Gas Wells in Pennsylvania: 2000-2012. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. 111 (30): 10955-10960. Available at: http://www.pnas.org/content/111/30/10955.abstract.

11. Shonkoff SB, Hays, J, Finkel, MF. 2014. The Public Health Dimensions of Shale Gas Development. Environmental Health Perspectives. 122 (8): 787-795. http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307866.

12. Law A, Hays J, Shonkoff SB, Finkel, ML. 2014. Re: Public Health England’s reply to Editorial on
its Draft Report on Shale Gas Extraction. BMJ. 348:g3280.

13. Law A, Hays J, Shonkoff SB, Finkel, ML. 2014. Public Health England’s Draft Report on Shale Gas Extraction: Mistaking Best Practices for Actual Practices. BMJ. 348:g2728.

14. Shonkoff SB. 2013. Shale gas and Tight Oil Development: Look Before We Leap. Global Energy Affairs. Available at: http://globalenergyinitiative.org/insights/103-shale-gas-tight- oil-development.html

15. Shonkoff SB, Morello-Frosch R, Pastor M, Sadd J. 2011. Environmental Health and Equity Implications of Climate Change and Mitigation Policies in California: A Review of the Literature. Climatic Change. Volume 109. Supp. 1.

16. Smith KR, Jerrett M, Anderson HR, Burnett RT, Stone V, Derwent R, Atkinson RW, Cohen A, Shonkoff SB, Krewski D, Pope CA, 3rd, Thun MJ, Thurston G. 2009. Public Health Benefits of Strategies to Reduce Greenhouse-Gas Emissions: Health Implications of Short-Lived Greenhouse Pollutants. The Lancet. 374(9707): 2091-2103.

17. Shonkoff SB, Morello-Frosch R, Pastor M, Sadd J. 2009. Minding the Climate Gap: Implications of Environmental Health Inequities for Mitigation Policies in California. Environmental Justice 2(4): 173-177.

18. Spencer DF, Ksander GG, Donovan MJ, Liow PS, Chan WK, Greenfield BK, Shonkoff SB,
Andrew S. 2006. Evaluation of Water Hyacinth Survival and Growth in the Sacramento Delta, California, Following Cutting. The Journal of Plant Management. 44: 50-60.

Honors and Awards

Pioneer Under 40 in Environmental Public Health; Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE)

Emerging Leader, Emerging Leaders Fund; The Claneil Foundation

Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award; University of California, Berkeley

Recent Teaching

Environmental Science Senior Research Seminar; University of California, Berkeley (Fall 2010 – Spring 2012)

Sociology of Natural Resources; University of California, Berkeley (Fall 2009)

Environmental Health and Development; University of California, Berkeley (Fall 2008)

Kathy Tran

Kathy Tran

Visiting Scholar, Research Scientist at Amgen
Education

PhD, Environmental Health Sciences; University of California, Berkeley

MPH, Global Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH); Emory University

BS, Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; University of California, Los Angeles

Research Interests
climate change, health equity, environmental justice, energy, policy
Research Description
My interest in place-based environmental hazards that have implications for climate change, health and environmental justice began at Emory University, where I completed my Master of Public Health. During my time there, I had the pleasure of working on projects with vulnerable populations and collaborating with policymakers in India and Atlanta, GA. I continue to strive to identify disproportionate impacts of environmental hazards in my work and am committed to translating my research to affect equitable policymaking. I am currently examining the relationship of California oil/gas development relative to prenatal health outcomes and drinking water resources.
Selected Publications

1. White AC, Khuu JK, Dang CY, Hu J, Tran K, Liu A, Gomez S,  Zhang Z, YI R, Scumpia P, Grigorian M, and Lowry WE. Stem cell quiescence acts as a tumor suppressor mechanism in hair follicle initiated squamous tumors. Nature Cell Biology. 2014 Jan;16(1):99-107. PubMed PMID: 24335650; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3874399.

2. Tran K, Azhar G, Nair R, Jaiswal A, Knowlton K, Mavalankar D, Hess J. A cross-sectional, randomized sample survey of household vulnerability to extreme heat among urban slum dwellers in Ahmedabad, Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Jun 18;10(6):2515-43. PubMed PMID: 23778061; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3717750.

3. White AC, Tran K, Khuu J, Dang C, Cui Y, Binder SW, Lowry WE. Defining the origins of Ras/p53-mediated squamous cell carcinoma. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 May 3;108(18):7425-30. PubMed PMID: 21502519; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3088581.

 

Honors and Awards

Mentored Research Award Fellowship (2017-2018)

EPA-NEJAC Youth Perspectives Climate Change Workgroup (2016-2018)

SAGE-IGERT Fellowship, UC Berkeley (2016-2018)

Tenbosch Graduate Fellowship, UC Berkeley (2014-2015)

NCAR Biannual Colloquium on Climate and Health Scholarship (July 2013)

American Public Health Association Environment Section Student Scholarship Award (September 2012)

Public Health Traineeship, Emory University (November 2011)

Recent Teaching
PH 150B: Introduction to Environmental Health; University of California, Berkeley

 

Jessica Trowbridge

Jessica Trowbridge

Visiting Scholar, Post Doctoral Fellow at UCSF Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment

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Education

PhD, Environmental Health Sciences; University of California, Berkeley

MPH, Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health; University of California, Berkeley

BS, Molecular Environmental Biology; University of California, Berkeley

AA; Merritt Community College

Research Interests
environmental exposures, environmental justice, occupational health, biomonitoring, endocrine disruption, reproductive health, environmental epidemiology
Research Description
Dr. Trowbridge is currently a post-doc with the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment at UCSF, she is also a visiting scholar with the SH/E lab. Her current research focuses on evaluating prenatal exposure to toxic environmental chemicals in relation to pregnancy and birth outcomes. Her dissertation work entailed exploring exposure to environmental chemicals in a cohort of women firefighters in San Francisco and exploring the association of exposure with early biomarkers of effect. Dr. Trowbridge is a Latina scientist dedicated to promoting diversity in STEM fields and conducting research in environmental health.

 

Honors and Awards

Switzer Environmental Leadership Fellowship; Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation (2019)
Targeted Research Training Grant; National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (2015-2020)
UC Berkeley SPH Alumni Association, Dr. Julia Quint Work and Environment Fellowship (2016-2020)
Hispanic Scholarship Fund Scholarship (2015-2016)
American Industrial Hygiene Foundation Scholarship (2017)
Biology Scholars Program Scholar; University of California, Berkeley (2001-2003)

 

 

Julia Rachel Varshavsky

Julia Rachel Varshavsky

Assistant Professor, Northeastern University Department of Health Sciences and Civil and Environmental Engineering

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Research Description
I conduct biologically-based, population-level studies on exposure and health risks associated with endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). I aim to improve public health by studying reproductive and developmental health impacts related to EDCs commonly found in consumer and personal care products and identifying opportunities to reduce exposure and associated health risks among vulnerable populations. I earned my MPH and PhD in environmental health sciences at the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health. My dissertation research focused on developing methods for; characterizing disparities in; and evaluating dietary sources of cumulative phthalates exposure. Prior to graduate school, I facilitated scientific dialogue and research translation around developmental impacts of environmental contaminants as the reproductive health working group coordinator for the Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE). I studied molecular biology as an undergraduate and contributed to laboratory research that improved chemical screening methods in water through microarray development. I enjoy spending free time outside with my 18 month old son, where we go on many long walks and have deep conversations about birds, airplanes, flowers, and buses. I also enjoy cooking, reading, traveling, and spending time with family and friends.

 

Contact

Katherine Wolf

Katherine Wolf

PhD Candidate, ESPM and MS student, Statistics
Education

PhD Student, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management; University of California, Berkeley

MS Student, Statistics; University of California, Berkeley

MESc, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; Yale University

MPH, Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health; Yale University

BA, Music; Vassar College

Research Interests
environmental justice, environmental epidemiology, health equity, air pollution, geographic information systems, community-based participatory research
Research Description

My research investigates disparities in exposures to environmental hazards, particularly air pollution, and associated human health outcomes.  Some of my prior work looks at associations between airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) components and African American racial residential segregation in the United States as well as the sociodemographic context of oil and gas disposal well locations in the United States.  I am particularly interested in collaborative research models in which scientists take direction from and explicitly share power with members of communities seeking relief from exposure to environmental hazards.
Selected Publications

1. Baccarelli AA, Zheng Y, Zhang X, Chang D, Liu L, Wolf KR, Zhang Z, McCracken JP, Díaz A, Bertazzi PA, Schwartz J, Wang S, Kang CM, Koutrakis P, Hou L.  Air pollution exposure and lung function in highly exposed subjects in Beijing, China: a repeated-measure study.  Particle and Fibre Toxicology.  2014 October;11:51.  doi: 10.1186/s12989-014-0051-7.  PMID: 25272992.  PMCID: PMC4192276.

2. Hou L, Barupal J, Zhang W, Zheng Y, Liu L, Zhang X, Dou C, McCracken JP, Díaz A, Motta V, Wolf KR, Bertazzi PA, Schwartz JD, Wang S, Baccarelli AA.  Particulate air pollution exposure and expression of viral and human microRNAs in blood.  Environmental Health Perspectives.  2016 March;124:344-350.  doi: 10.1289/ehp.1408519.  PMID: 26068961.  PMCID: PMC4786978.

Honors and Awards

Air and Waste Management Association Award

Berkeley Fellowship for Graduate Study

Yale Jan A. J. Stolwijk Fellowship in Environmental Epidemiology

Yale Climate Change and Health Initiative Summer Fellowship

Yale Hixon Center for Urban Ecology Fellowship

Yale Jubitz Family Endowment for Research Internships

Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies Master’s Research Award

Vassar Ford Scholar Award

Recent Teaching

Teaching Fellow, Principles of Epidemiology I (CDE 508a); Yale School of Public Health (Fall 2016)